Media kit

Media kitShare the STI Guidelines The Australian STI Management Guidelines for use in Primary Care are an essential resource for primary healthcare professionals. The 2020-2022 review resulted in a number of major updates, which are vital for healthcare workers to be aware of and apply to their practice. This page includes a range of materials for you to share with …

What’s New

What’s New?STI testing and management advice has changed Here’s what you need to knowA minor review of these Guidelines was undertaken in 2023-2024, with updates made to the following sections: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People Chlamydia Genital dermatology Hepatitis C Mycoplasma genitalium People who use drugs Regional and remote populations Syphilis Pregnant people These Guidelines were updated between 2020-2022 …

About

AboutBackground The Australian STI Management Guidelines for Use in Primary Care were developed under the auspice of the Australasian Sexual and Reproductive Health Alliance (ASRHA) and are managed by the Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine (ASHM). The Guidelines are an online resource for primary care health professionals. They provide concise information to support the prevention, …

Standard Asymptomatic Checkup

Standard Asymptomatic Check-upPrint as PDF▸Standard Asymptomatic Check-up To determine risk take a sexual history. Some subpopulations (e.g. men who have sex with men, sex workers, pregnant people, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, trans and gender diverse people) have special requirements for testing due to increased risk of infection, adverse health outcomes, community prevalence or other factors. Perform asymptomatic sexually …

Young people

Young peopleOverview Rates of chlamydia and gonorrhoea diagnoses in Australia are highest among people aged 15-29 years. Most young people attend a general practice at least once a year, and are often unaware of their risk of infection and that sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are often asymptomatic. The 9th edition of the RACGP Guidelines for Preventive Activities in General Practice …

Sex workers

Sex workersOverview Currently, there is no evidence that sex workers in Australia have higher rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) than the general population. Sustaining low STI rates remains a priority. High priority groups include street-based sex workers, sex workers who inject drugs, culturally and linguistically diverse sex workers, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander sex workers and men who have sex with men and transgender sex workers. …

Cervicitis

Cervicitis Overview Cervicitis is an inflamed cervix characterised by friability of the cervix with easily induced bleeding and/or mucopurulent discharge at the cervical os. Gonorrhoea as the causative organism of cervicitis is increasing in Australia. ▸Possible causesChlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are the most common causes of cervicitis. Other less common causes include: Mycoplasma genitalium, herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Trichomonas …

HIV

HIVOverview Untreated infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes chronic immune deficiency which can progress to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) after a variable period (2-20 years) but on average 10 years after infection. People with HIV are treated by combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) which is life long and should start as soon as possible after diagnosis regardless of CD4+ T-cell …

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis BOverview Anyone with a positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) needs ongoing monitoring and needs to be considered for treatment. A healthy carrier does not exist. Infection causes acute hepatitis, which may progress to chronic infection. Chronic hepatitis B infection (HBsAg positive) can cause hepatocellular carcinoma even in the absence of liver cirrhosis. Transmission occurs from mother to child …